Energy

Energy Is Everything

Publication date:
2009-04-24
First published in:
Online Opinion
Authors:
Micheal Lardelli
Abstract:

It is fascinating to watch the behaviour of our political and business leaders as they attempt to cope with the world’s deepening financial crisis. It is becoming clear that they don’t have a clue what is actually going on. Their blindness is explained by confusion about what actually enables economic growth. The shared delusion is that money makes the world go round.

As share and asset values crash we hear talk of deflation. Many nations are trying to counter this by expanding their money supply. However, they seem to have forgotten the most basic fact about money that we are taught in school - that it is a medium of exchange. Money allows agreements on relative “value” (how much of one thing will be exchanged for another) but it has no intrinsic value itself. It is simply a mechanism that allows the distribution of real “stuff”. So if the economy is crashing what is this “stuff” that is disappearing? It can be summed up in one word - energy.

Published in: Online Opinion, 23 April 2009
Available from: Online Opinion

Thermodynamics and the Economic Process

Publication date:
2008-12-01
First published in:
http://www.vocat.co.uk/
Authors:
John Bryant
Abstract:

This paper develops further a a model of the economic process concerning the application of thermodynamic laws to economics. The paper sets out relationships between economic output and capital, labour, resource and waste stocks, with specific reference to energy, and is backed up by analysis of data of world energy resources and climate change. the paper concludes that both energy resource availability and climate change will have significant, limiting effects on the forward path of economic development.

Published in: Vocat International Ltd
Available from: Vocat International Ltd

An analysis of the US and world oil production patterns using Hubbert-style curves

Publication date:
2000-12-16
First published in:
Mathematical Geology
Authors:
A.A. Bartlett
Abstract:

A quantitative analytical method, using a spreadsheet, has been developed which allows the determination of values of the three parameters that characterize the Hubbert-style Gaussian error curve that best fits the conventional oil production data both for the U.S. and the world. The three parameters are: the total area under the Gaussian which represents the estimated ultimate (oil) recovery ( EUR), the date of the maximum of the curve, and the half-width of the curve. The "best fit" is determined by adjusting the values of the three parameters to minimize the root-mean-square deviation ( RMSD ) between the data and the Gaussian. The sensitivity of the fit to changes in values of the parameters is indicated by an exploration of the rate at which the RMSD increases as values of the three parameters are varied from the values that give the best fit. The results of the analysis are:

1) the size of the U.S. estimated ultimate recovery ( EUR ) of oil is suggested to be 2.22 x 1011 barrels (0.222 trillion bbl) of which approximately three-fourths appears to have been produced through 1995;

2) if the world EUR is 2.0 x 1012 bbl, (2.0 trillion bbl) a little less than half of this oil has been produced through 1995, and the maximum of world oil production is indicated to be in 2004;

3) each increase of one billion barrels in the size of the world EUR beyond the value of 2.0 x 1012 bbl can be expected to result in a delay of approximately 5.5 days in the date of maximum production;

4) alternate production scenarios are presented for EURs of 3.0 and 4.0 trillion bbl.

Published in: Mathematical Geology, Volume 32, Issue 1
Available from: Al Bartlett.org or
Hubbertpeak.com

The Continuing Importance of Maximum Power

Publication date:
2004-11-24
First published in:
Ecological Modelling
Authors:
Charles A.S. Hall
Abstract:

Of the many extremely ingenious, powerful and, yes, frustrating concepts and approaches that Howard Odum left us, the one with the most power to change how we understand the Earth, was that of maximum power. This theoretical framework, has subverted how most of his students and colleagues think about systems in general, transformed the way we think about ecosystems, natural selection, and even our environmental and general politics. The concept has not always been a comfortable one, but it is an exceedingly exciting and commanding one … and therein lies its interest. For most of us who have been exposed to it in some detail, there is no doubt as to its veracity. What remains to be answered, however, is just how wide is its net?

Published in: Ecological Modelling, Volume 178, Issues 1-2, 15 October 2004, Pages 107-113
Available from: ScienceDirect

The Energy of Nature

Publication date:
2001-05-15
First published in:
The University of Chicago Press
Authors:
E.C. Pielou
Abstract:

In The Energy of Nature, E. C. Pielou explores energy's role in nature—how and where it originates, what it does, and what becomes of it. Drawing on a wide range of scientific disciplines, from physics, chemistry, and biology to all the earth sciences, as well as on her own lifelong experience as a naturalist, Pielou opens our eyes to the myriad ways energy and its transfer affect the earth and its inhabitants. Along the way we learn how energy is delivered to the earth from the sun; how it causes weather, winds, and tides; how it shapes the earth through mountain building and erosion; how it is captured and used by living things; how it is stored in chemical bonds; how nuclear energy is released; how it heats the unseen depths of the planet and is explosively revealed in the turmoil of earthquakes and volcanoes; how energy manifests itself in magnetism and electromagnetic waves; how we harness it to fuel human societies; and much more.

The Myth of Sustainable Development: Personal Reflections on Energy, its Relation to Neoclassical Economics, and Stanley Jevons

Publication date:
2004-06-01
First published in:
Journal of Energy Resources Technology
Authors:
Charlie A.S. Hall
Abstract:

Abstract not available

Published in: Journal of Energy Resources Technolology, June 2004, Volume 126, Issue 2
Available from: ASME Digital Library

The Paradox of Production

Publication date:
2008-03-27
First published in:
Energy Bulletin
Authors:
John Michael Greer
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